Teaching Egyptian fish farmers the industry’s best aquaculture practices has helped increase their production and income. Strengthening the industry’s small and medium-scale farms will generate new employment opportunities and meet the country’s growing demand for fish.
 
The training is part of the Improving Employment and Income through Development of Egypt’s Aquaculture Sector project, which is funded by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation and aims to create 10,000 new industry jobs.
 

The tropical waters of the Coral Triangle support the livelihoods of more than 130 million people. However, the area is under threat from factors including population growth, overfishing and the effects of climate change. An online spatial database, called the Coral Triangle Atlas, is helping decision makers to more effectively manage and protect these vital marine resources.

In rural Cambodia, where millions depend on fish for food and income, fish populations in natural wetlands are under threat from illegal fishing, habitat destruction and harmful pesticides used for agriculture.

In Bangladesh and Nepal, where the rates of undernutrition and poverty are high, the Agriculture and Nutrition Extension Project is working with small-scale farmers to increase nutrition and food security through the production of micronutrient-rich small fish and orange sweet potato.

Within the first year these men and women were able to substantially improve their income and it is anticipated that their standard of living will continue to improve.

Nepalese farmers, fish hatchery and nursery owners, feed mill operators and aquaculture experts have visited Bangladesh to learn new industry technologies.
 
Organized by the Agriculture and Nutrition Extension Project (ANEP), the technology exchange has helped increase productivity and improve incomes and food security for poor farmers.
 
Since 2012, the aquaculture component of the ANEP project has improved incomes and nutrition for more than 1,900 households in Bangladesh and 600 households in Nepal.

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