Vertical agriculture: Suspended horticulture in towers

The farmers of Bangladesh face many challenges associated with climate change and increases in population. Rising salinity, waterlogging, flooding and storm surges, coupled with a growing population that is expected to reach 250 million people by the year 2050, have resulted in a decrease in cultivable land for vegetable production. This brief descirbes how vertical agriculture can address the loss of cultivable land by maximizing the space around households and suspending horticulture production along trees, houses and bamboo structures.

State of the Coral Triangle Reports

These publications, consisting of a Regional State of the Coral Triangle report with six corresponding country-level State of the Coral Triangle reports, identify key issues that decision makers must address if sustainable development of the Coral Triangle’s coastal and marine resources is to be achieved. The Regional State of the Coral Triangle report summarizes each country’s biophysical and socioeconomic characteristics, as well as their institutional framework for governing marine resource use.

Solomon Islands State of the Coral Triangle Report: Summary

The Solomon Islands National Plan of Action (SI-NPOA): Coral Triangle Initiative on Coral Reefs, Fisheries, and Food Security (CTI-CFF) provides visionary guidance for the management of coral reefs and related ecosystems in the Solomon Islands (Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology and Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, 2010). It is consistent with the CTI Regional Plan of Action (RPOA), but also incorporates local situations and circumstances.

Responses to climate change: adaptation pathways to change

This project, Responding to Climate Change Using an Adaptation Pathways and Decision-making Approach, funded by the Asian Development Bank (ADB), aims to strengthen coastal and marine resource management in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific, by assisting communities in Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Timor Leste and Vanuatu to develop their own climate change adaptation implementation plans.

Reconceptualising adaptation to climate change as part of pathways of change and response

The need to adapt to climate change is now widely recognised as evidence of its impacts on social and natural systems grows and greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated. Yet efforts to adapt to climate change, as reported in the literature over the last decade and in selected case studies, have not led to substantial rates of implementation of adaptation actions despite substantial investments in adaptation science. Moreover, implemented actions have been mostly incremental and focused on proximate causes; there are far fewer reports of more systemic or transformative actions.

Planning the use of fish for food security in Solomon Islands

This study was funded through the USAID-supported Coral Triangle Support Partnership (CTSP). As part of the US CTI Support Program, CTSP is part of the United States Government’s commitment to promote the sustainable management of the marine and coastal resources in the Coral Triangle. In cooperation with the Coral Triangle national governments and the international community, CTSP is a five-year program that provides technical assistance and helps build capacity to address critical issues including food security, climate change, and marine biological diversity.

Mangrove ecosystem services and payments for blue carbon in Solomon Islands

The AusAID Development Research Project: Poverty Alleviation, Mangrove Conservation and Climate Change: Carbon offsets as payment for mangrove ecosystem services in Solomon Islands (# 49892) was designed to evaluate the potential for mangrove carbon revenue programs in Solomon Islands. The approach was to address three main questions: (1) How are mangrove ecosystem goods and services currently used and valued by coastal populations with a high reliance on a subsistence economy? (2) What is the total carbon stock held in mangrove ecosystems?

Functional aquatic ecosystems, inland fisheries and the Millennium Development Goals

Freshwater allocation in an environment of increasing demand and declining quality and availability is a major societal challenge. While biodiversity and the needs of local communities are often in congruence, the over-riding necessity of meeting national demands for power, food and, increasingly, mitigation of the hydrological effects of climate change, often supersedes these.

A framework for understanding climate change impacts on coral reef social-ecological systems

Corals and coral-associated species are highly vulnerable to the emerging effects of global climate change. The widespread degradation of coral reefs, which will be accelerated by climate change, jeopardizes the goods and services that tropical nations derive from reef ecosystems. However, climate change impacts to reef social-ecological systems can also be bi-directional.For example, some climate impacts, such as storms and sea level rise, can directly impact societies, with repercussions for how they interact with the environment.

Food security versus environment conservation: A case study of Solomon Islands' small-scale fisheries

The sustainable management of small-scale fisheries in coral reef ecosystems constitutes a difficult objective not least because these fisheries usually face several worsening pressures, including demographic growth and climate change. The implications are crucial in terms of food security as fish represents the major protein source for local populations in many regions reliant on small-scale fisheries. The case of the Solomon Islands’ fishery presented in this paper represents an illustrative example of these issues.


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