Water use at integrated aquaculture-agriculture farms: experiences with limited water resources in Egypt

Fish farming in Egypt is not formally recognized as an agricultural activity, so aquaculture cannot use water from irrigation canals. However, fish are raised as primary or secondary crops in combination with fruit and other plant crops. A study by the WorldFish Center found farms could efficiently use well water to intensively raise tilapia in aerated tanks and use the effluent to irrigate fruit trees, vegetables and flowers. Two other farms used water from nearby Nile irrigation canals to fill water storage reservoirs stocked with tilapia.

Value chain analysis of the aquaculture feed sector in Egypt

This study was carried out to evaluate the value chain performance of the aquaculture feed sector in Egypt, in terms of value addition, employment and profitability. The strengths and weaknesses of each link of the value chain were assessed and appropriate upgrading, management and development strategies were suggested. Quantitative data were collected for each link in the value-chain through structured questionnaires that were drafted and distributed to the key players in the sector; 25 fish feed mills and 34 fish farms covering different geographical and production regions.

Value-chain analysis: an assessment methodology to estimate Egyptian aquaculture sector performance

Egypt's aquaculture production (705,490 tonnes in 2009) is by far the largest of any African country and places it 11th in terms of global aquaculture production. The aquaculture sector in Egypt is now a mature one having developed over a period of more than 30 years, but the financial performance of the sector is not well understood or documented, even though value-chain analysis provides a methodological tool to do so.

Small-scale aquaculture: Global and national perspectives

Fish has been a staple food for over a billion people. Its demand is increasing due to growing population and awareness about health benefits of aquatic animal food. Disappointingly, wild catch worldwide is on the decline and aquaculture is emerging as the only solution. It grew at 9%/yr in the last 10 years becoming the fastest growing food production sector. At present, aquaculture produces only about 45 million t per year but it needs to be doubled by 2030 to meet its growing demand. Asia produces over 85% of the global farmed fish - mostly by small-scale farmers.

Production economics of Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) pond culture in El-Fayum Governorate, Egypt

Econometric techniques were used to estimate a production function for tilapia pond culture in El-Fayum Governorate, Egypt, utilizing cross-sectional field data. Explanatory variables were feed, initial stocking weight, and pond size. The function was used to examine returns to scale, estimate the productivity of feed and initial stocking weight, and estimate the profit maximizing demand equations for feed and fingerlings. Diminishing returns to scale seem to exist for tilapia pond culture.

Performance of mono-sex tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in rice field with different ditch size

The effects of ditch size on growth and production of mono-sex tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus in rain fed concurrent rice–fish system were technically and economically evaluated for a period of 4 months. Three different ditch sizes were tried: 5%, 10% and 15% of the total cultivable rice field. It is concluded that rice–fish farming in a rain fed ecosystem of Bangladesh with medium ditch size and stocking density of 5000 ha-1 mono-sex tilapia can achieve better economic return.

Meeting the food and nutrition needs of the poor: the role of fish and the opportunities and challenges emerging from the rise of aquaculture

People who are food and nutrition insecure largely reside in Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa and for many, fish represents a rich source of protein, micronutrients and essential fatty acids. The contribution of fish to household food and nutrition security depends upon availability, access and cultural and personal preferences. Access is largely determined by location, seasonality and price but at the individual level it also depends upon a person's physiological and health status and how fish is prepared, cooked and shared among household members.

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