Snail control by fish: an explanation for its failure.

Systematic studies on the performance of fish as snail eaters in waterbodies are rare. Here, trials with a promising African cichlid (Astatoreochromis alluaudi) revealed that the fish were only successful at reducing snail populations if there was nothing better to eat - and this is hardly the case. The fish need solid jaws to crush the snails but do not develop such jaws if they can find other, preferables foods. The prospects for this form of control are also discussed in the broader context.

Utilization of wetland ecosystem through fish-crop diversification for enhanced productivity and economic stability for fish-farm community of Indian sub-continent

This paper deals with a number of case studies that were undertaken during the last 8- 10 years in utilizing divergent ‘Tal’ wetland ecosystems (deep, semi-deep, temporary in a range of agro-ecological zones like NAZ, OAZ and Coastal Zone of the region) for the development of integrated management programmes using a range of approaches.

Effects of stocking density on production and economics of all-male tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) culture in a rain fed rice-fish ecosystem

Effects of stocking density on the growth, production, and economics of all-male tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were investigated in a rain-fed rice-fish ecosystem for a period of 120 days. Fish were stocked at the rate of 4000, 5000, and 6000 ha-1 in treatments T1, T2, and T3, respectively. Water quality was suitable for fish culture. Significantly higher growth was observed in T1 as compared to other treatments. SGR ranged from 1.26 to 1.51. Survival varied between 79% and 88% with treatment T1 producing the highest survival.

Effect of freshwater toxic and non toxic cyanobacteria, (Microcystis aeruginosa) strains on some biochemical parameters of Oreochromis niloticus

This study was planned to determine the grazing rate of O. niloticus from both toxic and non toxic strains of Microcystis aeruginosa with its effect on fish health through study of some clinical signs, hematological and biochemical parameters.

Drawing pictures of integrated farms helps everyone: an example from Vietnam

The participation of farmers in the research process related to the development of integrated farming processes is discussed with respect to observations made on the Mekong Delta in Vietnam. The use of drawing pictures of integrated agriculture-aquaculture systems as a means of helping both farmers and researchers to learn from each other in order to improve systems is noted.

A bright future for fish farming

It is highly unlikely that wild capture fisheries will be able to produce higher yields in future. For aquaculture the opposite is the case. No other food production sector has grown as fast over the past 20 years. Aquaculture is expected to satisfy the growing world population’s demand for fish – and at the same time protect ocean fish stocks. Hopes are pinned on farming as an alternative to over-fishing. But the use of copious amounts of feed derived from wild fish, the destruction of mangrove forests and the use of antibiotics have given fish farming a bad name.

Autonomous adaptation to climate change by shrimp and catfish farmers in Vietnam’s Mekong River delta

The Mekong River delta of Vietnam supports a thriving aquaculture industry but is exposed to the impacts of climate change. In particular, sea level rise and attendant increased flooding (both coastal and riverine) and coastal salinity intrusion threaten the long-term viability of this important industry. This working paper summarizes an analysis of the economics of aquaculture adaptation in the delta, focusing on the grow-out of two exported aquaculture species—the freshwater striped catfish and the brackish-water tiger shrimp.

Annual report 2013/2014

Improving the productivity of fisheries and aquaculture is vital to reducing hunger and poverty for millions of people in the developing world. Today, fish provides more than one billion poor people with most of their daily animal-source protein and, globally, more than 250 million people depend directly on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihoods; millions more are employed in fisheries and aquaculture value chains.

Socioeconomic factors that influence the adoption of small-scale rural fish farming at household level in Zimbabwe.

The study compares the socioeconomic profile of fish and nonfish farming households in three different agroecological regions in Zimbabwe. Some of the direct socioeconomic factors that influence the adoption of small-scale fish farming in the areas are also identified.

Water use at integrated aquaculture-agriculture farms: experiences with limited water resources in Egypt

Fish farming in Egypt is not formally recognized as an agricultural activity, so aquaculture cannot use water from irrigation canals. However, fish are raised as primary or secondary crops in combination with fruit and other plant crops. A study by the WorldFish Center found farms could efficiently use well water to intensively raise tilapia in aerated tanks and use the effluent to irrigate fruit trees, vegetables and flowers. Two other farms used water from nearby Nile irrigation canals to fill water storage reservoirs stocked with tilapia.

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