Sustaining aquaculture by developing human capacity and enhancing opportunities for women

Women are active participants in aquaculture supply chains, but a dearth of gender-disaggregated information hampers accurate understanding of their contribution. Research results and FAO National Aquaculture Sector Overview (NASO) fact sheets show that female participation rates vary by type and scale of enterprise and country. Women are frequently active in hatcheries and dominate fish processing plant labourers. Women’s work in small-scale aquaculture frequently is unrecognized, under or unpaid.

Review of national fisheries situation in Sri Lanka

Fisheries are an important source of protein and employment for Sri Lanka’s population. The declaration of the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) in 1976 gave the country a water area larger than its land area. The coastal fisheries resources consist of small and large pelagic fish, demersal and coral reef fish, invertebrates, shrimps and crabs. The small pelagic fish contribute 70% of the catch from coastal waters with an estimated annual production of 152 752 t in 1997.

The pattern of fish trade

An account is given of the general pattern regarding trade in fish products. Developed countries import more than they export, whereas developing countries import less. Problems involved and remedies are discussed, considering Southeast Asia in particular.

Fish Trade for a Better Future program brochure

Over the past 5 years, fish processors and traders, along with government leaders, have begun to demand a change in the way Africa trades its fish. In May 2014, the second Conference of African Ministers of Fisheries and Aquaculture (CAMFA) endorsed the African Union Policy Framework and Reform Strategy for Fisheries and Aquaculture in Africa, which prioritizes fish trade and aims to promote responsible and equitable fish trade and marketing by significantly harnessing the benefits of Africa’s fisheries and aquaculture.

Fish production, consumption and trade in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review analysis

This analysis is an output of Sub-Saharan Fish Trade in a Changing Climate, a World Bank–funded study conducted in 2010–2011 by WorldFish. Its overall objective is to develop an understanding of the supply and demand for low-value, regionally and domestically traded fish, which are important in the diets of lower-income urban and rural consumers in Sub-Saharan Africa, to inform cooperation on trade and food security and projection of regional trends in supply and demand for food fish.

Vulnerability of female fish traders to HIV/AIDS along the fish market chain of the south-eastern arm of Lake Malawi: Analysis report

The objectives of this study were first, to understand the market chain of fish as traded by women in the south-eastern Arm of Lake Malawi, with a specific focus on analyzing how fish is moved from the lake to the wholesale market. Secondly, the study identifies HIV/AIDS vulnerability factors along this market chain i.e. from the point of catch to the wholesale market.

The 'Fish Trader+' model: reducing female traders' vulnerability to HIV

Analysis from research and practice in Africa shows that fishing communities are hardly reached by HIV-related services, education, and business services, partly because of the efforts and costs involved and a lack of good practice in reaching out to these often remote areas. At the same time, fish traders, especially women, travel regularly to remote fishing camps to purchase fish. Although female fish traders may be exposed to HIV, violence and abuse in their interactions and relationships with fishermen, economic necessity keeps them in this trade.

The Differential effects of food safety regulations on animal products trade: The case of crustacean product trade

Chloramphenicol is a broad-spectrum antibiotic that was historically used as a veterinary drug for farm animal disease treatment purposes and it is currently used in human treatment; however, this is a banned substance. This paper investigates the impact of advancing chloramphenicol analytical standards on crustacean imports in the EU15, Japan, and North America. The paper extends the work of Disdier and Marette (2010) by exploring the differential effect of standards on products. We use a Heckman sample selection specification to address zero trade at the product level.

Trading fish for sex in sub-Saharan Africa

Chris Béné's article "Women and Fish-for-Sex" (FFS) is being highlighted in this issue of id21. The researchers use the example of a small-scale fishing community in the Kafue flats region of Zambia, and review other cases in the world. They demonstrate how economic impoverishment, which is often put forward to explain FFS transactions, is too simplistic to capture the complexity of the FFS phenomenon.

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