A workshop on length-based methods in fisheries analysis in the Solomon Islands

A brief account is given of a workshop organized by the South Pacific Research Coordination Unit of the ForumFisheries Agency in order to examine the use of length frequency data as a tool in fish population assessment in the South Pacific region. The workshop concentrated on the ELEFAN suite of programmes and length frequency data for species from a variety of taxa and habitats were analyzed.

Uganda and Malawi field pilots of proposed LSMS fisheries module: summary report

While an overwhelming majority of sub-Saharan African countries exhibit serious weaknesses in statistics pertaining to crop and livestock sectors, the deficiencies in terms of nationallyrepresentative data on the fishery sector are even more acute. The very little data available on the sector are essentially derived from case studies of selected fisheries, and the limited nationally representative data available are generally derived from a few questions included in the livestock section of household surveys.

Trophic model of the coastal fisheries ecosystem in the Gulf of Thailand

The biomass of 40 ecological groups, the diet composition of prey and predators, production/biomass (P/B) and consumption/biomass (Q/B) ratios, and catches were used as basic input to parameterize an Ecopath model of the Gulf of Thailand. Following construction of a mass-balance ecosystem model, a time-dynamic simulation model (Ecosim) was used to simulate the impact of change in fishing effort. This was done using time series data to validate the historic fisheries development in the Gulf of Thailand prior to using the model for forward-looking simulations.

Some personal experiences and comments on the management of Italian marine fisheries

The recent transition, in Italy, to an improved sampling scheme for fisheries catch and effort data, is described, with emphasis on the interactions between civil servants and fisheries scientists and on specific features of Italian fishery resources and research that may be common with those of some developing countries.

Socioeconomics and small-scale fisheries

Socioeconomic aspects of small-scale fisheries in southeast Asia are considered. Income levels in fisheries were generally found to be lower than comparable groups within the same community. Country differences occurred and some of the factors responsible for these income differences include: 1) type of gear and how it is used; 2) marketing structures; 3) race, religion or caste; 4) government programmes; and 5) introduction of aquaculture. It is believed that further research and information are required for the industry.

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