Vulnerability of aquaculture in the tropical Pacific to climate change

In this chapter, the authors assess the vulnerability of aquaculture in the tropical Pacific to climate change. It begins by summarising recent and potential aquaculture production to set the scene for the sector, and then use the framework outlined in Chapter 1, based on exposure, sensitivity, potential impact and adaptive capacity, to evaluate the vulnerability of the main commodities for food security and livelihoods.

Tonle Sap scoping report

The scoping mission team was composed of 14 people representing research institutions (RUPP), government (FiA, IFReDI), NGOs (ANKO, ADIC) and CGIAR institutions (WorldFish and Bioversity). The scoping trip was carried out over a 7-day period from April 28 to May 4 within eight (8) communities in Kampong Thom, Siem Reap, Battambang, Pursat and Kampong Chhnang. In addition, panel discussions were held with local government, fishery, agriculture and water management institutions, NGOs, the private sector and communities, and were convened in Siem Reap, Battambang and Pursat.

Teaching the Adivasi to fish for a lifetime of benefit in Bangladesh

The Adivasi Fisheries Project (AFP) set out in 2007 to help Adivasis in the north and northwest of Bangladesh find new and more sustainable livelihoods. It is based on 2 decades of WorldFish research in Bangladesh on aquaculture techniques for smallholders and community fisheries management and targeted disadvantaged rural miniorities called Adivasi. The enduring effects of the Adivasi Fisheries Project (AFP) are still being felt, three years after the project ended.

Supporting gender-inclusive dialogue over natural resource management

Rural households who fail to gain a voice in decisions over the management of shared forests, pasturelands, wetlands and fisheries face heightened risks to their livelihoods, particularly as competition increases between existing and new user groups. Exclusion from decision-making increases vulnerability of rural households, making it more difficult for them to move out of poverty and thwarting broader efforts to achieve sustainable resource management. Poor rural women in particular often face institutionalized barriers to effective participation in resource management.

Strengthening community roles in aquatic resource governance in Uganda

Lake Victoria fisheries face severe environmental stresses. Stocks are declining in a context of increasing population and growing demand for the lake’s resources. Rising competition between users is putting conservation goals and rural livelihoods at risk. While Uganda’s co-management policy framework is well-developed, key resources for implementation are lacking, enforcement is poor, and the relations between stakeholders are unequal. Poor rural resource users face significant challenges to effectively participate in fisheries decision-making.

Stimulating investment in pearl farming in Solomon Islands: Final report

The overall objective of the project is the reduction of poverty in rural areas of Solomon Islands through creation of livelihoods based on sustainable aquaculture. This fits within the over-arching goals of the WorldFish Center in the Pacific to reduce poverty and hunger in rural communities, and with the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) to stimulate rural development and to develop aquaculture.

Solomon Islands: Western Province situation analysis

Aquatic agricultural systems (AAS) are places where farming and fishing in freshwater and/or coastal ecosystems contribute significantly to household income and food security. Globally, the livelihoods of many poor and vulnerable people are dependent on these systems. In recognition of the importance of AAS, the CGIAR Research Program (CRP) is undertaking a new generation of global agricultural research programs on key issues affecting global food security and rural development.

The socio-economic context for improving food security through land based aquaculture in Solomon Islands: A peri-urban case study

Future fish demand-supply scenarios project that investment in aquaculture will be needed to ensure fish for food security in Solomon Islands. In 2010 a study of two peri-urban areas of Solomon Islands analysed the demand and potential for inland aquaculture, and the role of the introduced Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) in household livelihoods and existing value chains. Of 178 households interviewed, marine reef fish were the preferred fish for consumption, although tinned fish was also common.

Small-scale fisheries through the wellbeing lens

Despite longstanding recognition that small-scale fisheries make multiple contributions to economies, societies and cultures, assessing these contributions and incorporating them into policy and decision-making has suffered from a lack of a comprehensive integrating ‘lens’. This paper focuses on the concept of ‘wellbeing’ as a means to accomplish this integration, thereby unravelling and better assessing complex social and economic issues within the context of fisheries governance.

Small-scale aquaculture development model for rural Nepal

The majority of rural farmers in Nepal are small holders and their livelihood is based on agriculture. Three projects on small- scale aquaculture, with focus on women’s involvement, were completed in Kathar and Kawasoti Village Development Committees (VDCs) of Chitwan and Nawalparasi districts, respectively during 2000-2007. Based on the experience from these projects, guidelines/ steps for the development of small-scale aquaculture in rural areas were drawn.

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