Value chain analysis of Lake Nasser fisheries in Aswan, Upper Egypt

This report documents the outputs of the Aswan fisheries value chain study that took place in January and February 2015. This value chain analysis forms part of the Youth Employment in Aswan Governorate (YEAG) project funded by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) and led by CARE Egypt in partnership with WorldFish. The aim of the YEAG project is to increase incomes and employment for youth, women and men in Aswan by focusing on improving the performance of key value chains and enhancing the enabling environment.

Tonle Sap scoping report

The scoping mission team was composed of 14 people representing research institutions (RUPP), government (FiA, IFReDI), NGOs (ANKO, ADIC) and CGIAR institutions (WorldFish and Bioversity). The scoping trip was carried out over a 7-day period from April 28 to May 4 within eight (8) communities in Kampong Thom, Siem Reap, Battambang, Pursat and Kampong Chhnang. In addition, panel discussions were held with local government, fishery, agriculture and water management institutions, NGOs, the private sector and communities, and were convened in Siem Reap, Battambang and Pursat.

STREAMS program brochure

The Sustainable Transformation of Egypt’s Aquaculture Market System The Sustainable Transformation of Egypt’s Aquaculture Market System (STREAMS) project aims to increase production of inexpensive, nutritious and safe fish from sustainable aquaculture systems to help improve the health and nutrition of Egypt’s resource-poor while creating employment and increasing incomes along the aquaculture value chain.

Stimulating investment in pearl farming in Solomon Islands: Final report

The overall objective of the project is the reduction of poverty in rural areas of Solomon Islands through creation of livelihoods based on sustainable aquaculture. This fits within the over-arching goals of the WorldFish Center in the Pacific to reduce poverty and hunger in rural communities, and with the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) to stimulate rural development and to develop aquaculture.

Poverty alleviation and women’s empowerment through aquaculture: an experience from Nepal

An adaptive research project carried out involving women members of ethnic Tharu, Darai, Bote and Gurung communities in Chitwan and Nawalparasi districts in Nepal between 2000 and 2007 evaluated the role of a farm pond in diversification of livelihoods and reducing vulnerability. A newly introduced aquaculture sub-system complemented well with the existing farming systems by virtue of increased synergistic relationships among the three sub-systems transforming traditional mixed crop-livestock farming systems to more diversified Integrated Agriculture Aquaculture (IAA) Systems.

Informal fish retailing in rural Egypt: Opportunities to enhance income and work conditions for women and men

Poor rural consumers benefit from Egypt’s aquaculture sector through access to small and medium-sized farmed tilapia sold by informal fish retailers, many of whom are women. In fact, informal fish retail is the main, if not only, segment of the farmed fish value chain where women are found. This report aims to inform current and future strategies to improve conditions in informal fish retail by understanding in more depth the similarities and differences in employment quality and outcomes across different fish retailers.

Hidden harvest: The global contribution of capture fisheries

The important contribution of fi sheries to human well-being is frequently underestimated. This report highlights that contribution. The report focuses on small-scale fi sheries and developing countries because the livelihoods of 90 percent of the 120 million employed in fi sheries are in the small-scale fi sheries, and almost all of those workers, 97 percent, live in developing countries. Many small-scale fi shing communities have high levels of poverty, and poverty reduction is a core focus of the contributing partners to the report.

Fish Trade for a Better Future program brochure

Over the past 5 years, fish processors and traders, along with government leaders, have begun to demand a change in the way Africa trades its fish. In May 2014, the second Conference of African Ministers of Fisheries and Aquaculture (CAMFA) endorsed the African Union Policy Framework and Reform Strategy for Fisheries and Aquaculture in Africa, which prioritizes fish trade and aims to promote responsible and equitable fish trade and marketing by significantly harnessing the benefits of Africa’s fisheries and aquaculture.

Common-pool resources, livelihoods, and resilience: critical challenges for governance in Cambodia

Common-pool resource management is a critical element in the interlocked challenges of food security, nutrition, poverty reduction, and environmental sustainability. This paper examines strategic policy choices and governance challenges facing Cambodia‘s forests and fisheries, the most economically important subsectors of agriculture that rely on common-pool resources. It then outlines policy priorities for institutional development to achieve improvements in implementing these goals.

Alleviating poverty through aquaculture: progress, opportunities and improvements

Significant changes in our understanding of the interrelationships between aquaculture and poverty have occurred in the last decade. In particular, there is a growing realization that the impacts of aquaculture need to be assessed from a value-chain perspective rather than through a narrow production focus. In recent years, understandings of poverty and the forms, outcomes and importance of aquaculture have also shifted. Terms in current use are first clarified, including those related to scale and location of aquaculture.

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