WorldFish in Nigeria

WorldFish has a long history of working in Africa, including in nearby Ghana and Cameroon, to strengthen the continent’s aquaculture sector by conducting research and providing training. WorldFish aims to harness this experience, combined with its expertise in fish genetics, to boost aquaculture productivity and enhance nutrition and food security in Nigeria. WorldFish will draw on its involvement and support from the African Union InterAfrican Bureau of Animal Resources to deliver this work.

WorldFish in Egypt

Since launching its research program in Egypt in 1998, WorldFish has delivered high quality, practical research related to the country’s aquaculture and fishery sector. A key research focus has been on improving fish genetics to transform Egypt into a role model for African aquaculture development. WorldFish works closely with aquaculture stakeholders, the private sector and government organizations to deliver research on increasing aquaculture productivity, increasing the flow-on benefits of fish farming to women and youth, and enhancing fish value chains.

WorldFish in Bangladesh

Since 1989, WorldFish has been working with the Bangladesh Government and development partners to create a more productive fisheries and aquaculture sector that contributes to diversified and resilient rural livelihoods and promotes food and nutrition security.

Genetic parameters for uniformity of harvest weight and body size traits in the GIFT strain of Nile tilapia

Animal breeding programs have been very successful in improving the mean levels of traits through selection. However, in recent decades, reducing the variability of trait levels between individuals has become a highly desirable objective. Reaching this objective through genetic selection requires that there is genetic variation in the variability of trait levels, a phenomenon known as genetic heterogeneity of environmental (residual) variance.

Genetic improvement of farmed tilapias: Response to five generations of selection for increased body weight at harvest in Oreochromis niloticus and the further impact of the project

Selection for increased body weight at harvest in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) was carried out for five generations from 1991 to 1996, as a part of the project Genetic Improvement of Farmed Tilapias (GIFT). The base population for selection was composed of a mixture of various three- and four-way cross individuals descending from four wild African strains and four farmed Asian strains.

Development of Diversity Arrays Technology markers as a tool for rapid genomic assessment in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

The development of genomic markers is described for Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, using the Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) genotype-by-sequencing platform. A total of 13 215 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and 12 490 silicoDArT (dominant) markers were identified from broodstock of two selective breeding programs [Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia (GIFT) strain from Malaysia and the Abbassa strain from Egypt]. Over 10 000 SNPs were polymorphic in either strain, and 2985 and 3087 showed strain-specific polymorphisms for the GIFT and Abbassa strains respectively.

Breeding for robustness: Investigating the genotype-by-environment interaction and micro-environmental sensitivity of Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

The objectives of this study were (i) to quantify the degree of G x E by assessing the growth performance of Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia (GIFT) across three countries (Malaysia, India and China) and (ii) to quantify the genetic heterogeneity of environmental variance for body weight at harvest (BW) in GIFT as a measure of micro-environmental sensitivity.

Annual Report 2017

The CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH) is a new CRP that builds on earlier CRPs for Livestock and Fish (L&F) and Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) as well as prior research by WorldFish and the managing partners. Key outcomes from the two flagships of Sustainable Aquaculture and Sustaining Small-scale Fisheries during 2017, including milestones achieved, are summarized in this report.

Annual report 2017

This annual report highlights some of our key achievements over the past year as we progress towards our impact targets. In Asia and Africa, our genetic improvement program took a major step forward with the use of genomic selection tools to introduce characteristics such as disease resistance and feed efficiency into our improved tilapia strains. These are vital for ensuring the productivity and sustainability of fish farms, particularly in Africa, where aquaculture investment is critical to meet current and future food demands.

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