Nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs): A technology to boost fisheries production and combat malnutrition in Timor-Leste

Benefits of artisanal nearshore FADs in Timor-Leste • Food production and nutrition security: FADs provide an opportunity to increase the sustainable production of nutrient-rich food in Timor-Leste to combat chronic malnutrition. • Coastal resource management: FADS transfer fishing effort from the reef to the pelagic zone. • Climate change adaptation: FADS act as a food security buffer against socioeconomic and climate shocks, and they increase the resilience of coral reef ecosystems.

Illuminating Hidden Harvests: The contribution of small-scale fisheries to sustainable development

This brief provides an update on the status of the Illuminating Hidden Harvests (IHH) study and shares emerging insights on the need for better data collection and analysis, and additional monitoring capacity to improve our collective understanding of small-scale fisheries. This is critical to increasing government attention and improving policy responses and outcomes for the sector.

 

Strengthening small-scale fisheries for food and nutrition security, human well-being and environmental health in Zambia

Zambia is rich in aquatic resources with 15 million ha of water in the form of rivers, lakes and swamps. These water bodies support diverse and widespread capture fisheries, particularly small-scale fisheries (SSF) that make significant contributions to human well-being, food and nutrition as well as to local, national and regional economies. The fisheries sector has a critically important role in food systems in Zambia and in addressing complex and evolving nutritional priorities, as well as the environmental and climate change challenges.

Annual Report 2019

The 2019 Annual Report outlines the CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH) achievements in delivering evidence-based solutions that address the complex challenges and opportunities in fish agri-food systems in the developing world. Three years into the Program, FISH research is having a positive impact on the lives of people who depend on fisheries and aquaculture in global food systems.

WorldFish in Tanzania

Fisheries are an important source of food, income and nutrition in Tanzania, where 25% of the country’s population depends on coastal resources or inland lakes for their livelihoods. Over 180,000 people are employed in the fisheries sector, with a further 19,223 people involved in fish farming. WorldFish is working with the Tanzanian government and development partners to increase aquaculture production, reduce postharvest fish losses and enhance the role of fish in nutrition.

WorldFish in Malawi

Since 1987, WorldFish has been working with the Malawi Government, universities and development partners to create a more productive fisheries sector that contributes to diversified and resilient rural livelihoods and promotes food and nutrition security. Past efforts have included developing improved aquaculture technologies, implementing holistic ecosystem approaches to fisheries management, supporting the creation of improved fisheries policies, and providing scientific training to partners in Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia.

Winners and losers in area-based management of a small-scale fishery in the Colombian Pacific

The Pacific coast of Colombia has some of the most extensive mangrove forests in South America. As an isolated region and one of the country's poorest, coastal communities rely on fishing as a main source of animal protein and income. In an attempt to reverse declining trends of fisheries resources, in 2008, an Exclusive Zone of Artisanal Fishing closed to industrial fishing, was established by stakeholders in the Northern Chocó region. Here we present a case study to investigate the effects of this area-based management on fisheries productivity and catch composition.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Small-scale fisheries