Myanmar fisheries: Overview (Burmese version)

The Myanmar Fishery Partnership (MFP) is a new initiative being established to assist the Myanmar government in strengthening effective collaboration for the sustainable development of Myanmar’s fisheries and aquaculture sector. Four policy briefs have been developed by the Myanmar Fisheries Partnership to help the government address the most challenging issues facing fisheries in Myanmar.

Myanmar fisheries: Offshore (Burmese version)

Myanmar’s offshore fish stocks have been depleted by up to 80% since 1979, exposing Myanmar’s people to significant economic, food security, nutrition and environmental risks. This ecosystem decline has been driven by out-dated and weak laws and policies and by inadequate management and institutional capacity. Investment in protecting and restoring fish stocks, ecosystems and habitats is required.

Myanmar fisheries: Freshwater fisheries (Burmese version)

The freshwater fisheries in Myanmar are economically significant and important to livelihoods and food security. Yet significant threats to the resource base and public demand call for the development of management initiatives, legal adjustments and a people-centered approach. This brief identifies a series of options and priorities that could help improving freshwater fisheries management towards a more sustainable and equitable exploitation of inland fish resources.

Myanmar fisheries: Aquaculture

Fish is an extremely important component of the Myanmar diet, and demand is growing quickly as the country urbanizes and incomes rise. Aquaculture is ideally placed to meet this demand, while also raising farm incomes and creating employment. This brief identifies three sets of policy options that could help to unlock the full potential of aquaculture’s contributions to rural growth and national food supply.

Genetic parameters for survival during the grow-out period in the GIFT strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and correlated response to selection for harvest weight

The aims of this study were the estimation of genetic parameters for survival rate from tagging until harvest and the evaluation of the correlated response in survival rate to selection for harvest weight in the genetically improved farmed tilapia(GIFT) strain.

The effect of daily consumption of the small fish Amblypharyngodon mola or added vitamin A on iron status: a randomised controlled trial among Bangladeshi children with marginal vitamin A status

Amblypharyngodon mola (mola) is a nutrient-rich, small fish found in ponds and rice fields in Bangladesh. The aim of the present intervention was to assess the effect of mola consumption on iron status in children with marginal vitamin A status.

Improving Employment and Income through Development of Egypt’s Aquaculture Sector (IEIDEAS) project

The Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC)-funded Improving Employment and Income through Development of Egypt’s Aquaculture Sector (IEIDEAS) project was implemented by WorldFish in partnership with CARE Egypt and the Egyptian Ministry of Agriculture and Land Reclamation from 2011 to 2014 and later extended to November 2015. The project focused on four governorates with significant aquaculture production (Kafr El Sheikh, Behera, Sharkia and Fayoum) and one governorate (El Mineya), where aquaculture was a new activity.

Coalitions to achieve gender equality at scale: Gender development and coordinating subcommittees and networks as drivers of change in Zambia

Gender inequality affects development outcomes, and it results in sub-optimal returns to development investments. Formal structures have been put in place to address these issues, but their effectiveness is hampered by a number of institutional constraints. This brief summarizes the findings of a scoping study conducted to understand the strengths and areas of growth of the gender development and coordinating subcommittees at the district and provincial levels in western Zambia, and of the gender networks at the national level.

A longitudinal evaluation of the Communication, Education and Public Awareness (CEPA) campaign for the Philippine crocodile Crocodylus mindorensis in northern Luzon, Philippines

The Philippine crocodile Crocodylus mindorensis is Critically Endangered and its range is restricted to a few localities in human-dominated landscapes. Therefore, the survival of this species in the wild depends strongly on the support of local people. Communication and education are prerequisites for successful in situ conservation.

Feed the Future Sierra Leone Agriculture Project

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Feed the Future Sierra Leone Agriculture Project supports the development of rice and fish farming systems to increase productivity and improve food and nutrition security and incomes. This factsheet outlines the key components. The project focuses on Tonkolili District, which has the highest prevalence of stunting and underweight among children under 5 in the country.


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