Keeping food on the table: Human responses and changing coastal fisheries in Solomon Islands

Globally the majority of commercial fisheries have experienced dramatic declines in stock and catch. Likewise, projections for many subsistence fisheries in the tropics indicate a dramatic decline is looming in the coming decades. In the Pacific Islands coastal fisheries provide basic subsistence needs for millions of people. A decline in fish catch would therefore have profound impacts on the health and livelihoods of these coastal communities.

Planning a nutrition-sensitive approach to aquatic agricultural systems research in Solomon Islands

Aquatic agricultural systems are places where fishing and farming in freshwater and/or coastal systems contribute significantly to household nutrition, food security and income. In Solomon Islands, where aquatic agricultural systems form the foundation of the rural economy, 80% of the population are rural, subsistence-oriented, smallholder farmers and fishers. Communities dependent on these aquatic agricultural systems face major challenges from rising population and declining quality and availability of marine and land resources.

Investing in carp seed quality improvements in homestead aquaculture: lessons from Bangladesh

Lack of quality seed and technical knowhow are considered major constraints to improving aquaculture productivity and profitability in Bangladesh. This paper assesses the outcomes of investments in improving carp seed quality and farmer training, targeting poor and women fish farmers, on the productivity and profitability of homestead aquaculture systems in Southwest Bangladesh.

Social capital, conflict, and adaptive collaborative governance: exploring the dialectic

Previously lineal and centralized natural resource management and development paradigms have shifted toward the recognition of complexity and dynamism of social-ecological systems, and toward more adaptive, decentralized, and collaborative models. However, certain messy and surprising dynamics remain under-recognized, including the inherent interplay between conflict, social capital, and governance. In this study we consider the dynamic intersections of these three often (seemingly) disparate phenomena.

Exploring the intricate relationship between poverty, gender inequality and rural masculinity: A Case study from an Aquatic Agricultural System in Zambia

Many Zambians rely on wetlands, lakes, and rivers for their livelihoods. Social norms and power relations restrict access to natural resources provided by these aquatic agricultural systems for certain social groups, thus differentially impacting livelihood security (especially for women). A gender transformative lens and the concept of the “masculine rural” helps exploring poverty in the Barotse Floodplain in western Zambia.

Reaping the reef: Provisioning services from coral reefs in Solomon Islands

Coral reefs are recognized as globally important ecosystems, for their fisheries, tourism and biodiversity values in particular, with an estimated annual contribution of $30 billion to the global economy. The benefits that coral reef ecosystems provide through their provisioning, regulating, cultural and supporting services are critical for human wellbeing. The Coral Triangle region (which includes the waters of Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea (PNG), the Philippines, Solomon Islands and Timor Leste) supports the highest coral and reef fish species diversity in the world.

Contagious exploitation of marine resources

Rising global demand for seafood presents challenges for managing marine resources, many of which are declining or threatened. The authors describe a new and rapid pattern of contagious marine resource exploitation, which spreads via global sourcing networks to satisfy rising demand. They use sea cucumbers to illustrate the concept, given their wide geographic distribution but specific market for consumption in China.

Genetic and non-genetic indirect effects for harvest weight in the GIFT strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

The main objective of this study was to quantify the heritable variation for growth rate of GIFT, and the contribution of IGEs to this heritable variation. Here we describe the experiment conducted for this purpose, and present estimated parameters of genetic and non-genetic indirect effects on growth rate in the GIFT strain.

Empowering community-based ecosystem approaches to fisheries management: Strategies for effective training and learning

In March 2015, regional Pacific stakeholders and Governments engaged in collaborative planning to establish a new direction in the management of Coastal Fisheries. A New Song for Coastal Fisheries: Pathways to Change calls for a “...new and innovative approach to dealing with declines in coastal fisheries resources and related ecosystems”. A New Song is an important step forward for coastal fisheries management across a complex and diverse region. This paper argues that a strategic and integrated approach to capacity development, learning and training will support its full implementation.

Vertical agriculture: Homestead horticulture suspended in sacks

Suspending horticulture in sacks above the ground can result in higher levels of productivity for vegetables when the challenges of unfertile or saline soil, flooding, waterlogging, and land and water constraints are regularly encountered. Previously used feed and fertilizer sacks are filled with a high-productivity soil mixture. Vegetables are grown on the top and/or in holes cut into the sides of the sacks. While growing vegetables in sacks has existed for many years in Bangladesh, the technique has been modified by WorldFish in collaboration with farmer researchers.

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