Can community-based adaptation increase resilience

A central claim of community-based adaptation (CBA) is that it increases resilience. Yet, the concept of resilience is treated inconsistently in CBA, obscuring discussion of the limitations and benefits of resilience thinking and undermining evaluation of resilience outcomes in target communities. This paper examines different participatory assessment activities carried out as part of CBA case studies in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands.

A Manual for improving fish production in Northern Zambia through integrated farming systems

This manual was written as part of the Integrated Research in Development for Improved Livelihoods Programme in Northern Province, Zambia (IRDLP) and is primarily intended for extension agents to use with smallholder farmers engaged in semi-intensive fish farming in Northern Zambia. The IRDLP is an Irish Aid-funded project implemented by WorldFish, Harvest Plus and the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).

Impact of the community-based fish culture system on expenditure and inequality: Evidence from Bangladesh

This study investigated the impact of a Community-based Fish Culture (CBFC) system on household expenditure and how expenditure inequality in the fish-producing communities has changed due to involvement in the CBFC system. Six floodplains, comprising three project sites and three controls, were chosen from three river basin areas of Bangladesh; data for this study were collected for a period of 3 yr. A propensity score matching method was used to evaluate the impact of CBFC on household expenditure; while a Gini coefficient and Gini decomposition were used to estimate inequality.

Aquaculture technologies and best management practices training program

The aquaculture technologies and best management practices training is a 2-week course designed for any professional working in aquaculture Africa or other parts around of world. The course covers the basics of farming aquatic animals in fresh and marine waters. It provides updated and integrated scientific and technological knowledge on the various disciplines needed for successful and responsible hatchery and farm management. The course will take place from 9 to 20 October 2016.

Suitability of different fish species for cultivation in integrated floating cage aquageoponics system (IFCAS) in Bangladesh

In rural areas of Bangladesh, the vast majority of households own only small or large shaded homestead ponds located next to their dwellings and the pond dikes are covered with large timber trees, a situation where it is quite difficult to produce fish and vegetables on the dikes. Incorporation of appropriate technologies however, can successfully utilize homestead ponds for commercial fish farming that can meet growing protein and nutritional demand.

Effects of white spot disease and bio-security on shrimp farming in Bangladesh

Shrimp culture is of central importance in Bangladesh, shrimp being the cash component of many smallholder, polyculture fish farming systems. Shrimp also contributes substantial income through exports. However, production remains low compared with other countries for a number of reasons, including low availability of good quality post larvae (PL) seed stock, lack of credit facilities, and disease problems.

Myanmar fisheries: Overview (Burmese version)

The Myanmar Fishery Partnership (MFP) is a new initiative being established to assist the Myanmar government in strengthening effective collaboration for the sustainable development of Myanmar’s fisheries and aquaculture sector. Four policy briefs have been developed by the Myanmar Fisheries Partnership to help the government address the most challenging issues facing fisheries in Myanmar.

Myanmar fisheries: Offshore (Burmese version)

Myanmar’s offshore fish stocks have been depleted by up to 80% since 1979, exposing Myanmar’s people to significant economic, food security, nutrition and environmental risks. This ecosystem decline has been driven by out-dated and weak laws and policies and by inadequate management and institutional capacity. Investment in protecting and restoring fish stocks, ecosystems and habitats is required.

Myanmar fisheries: Freshwater fisheries (Burmese version)

The freshwater fisheries in Myanmar are economically significant and important to livelihoods and food security. Yet significant threats to the resource base and public demand call for the development of management initiatives, legal adjustments and a people-centered approach. This brief identifies a series of options and priorities that could help improving freshwater fisheries management towards a more sustainable and equitable exploitation of inland fish resources.

Domestic crop booms, livelihood pathways and nested transitions: Charting the implications of Bangladesh's pangasius boom

Rapidly transforming Asian food systems are oriented largely towards domestic markets, yet literature on Asian crop booms deals almost exclusively with commodities produced for export. With reference to pangasius aquaculture in Bangladesh, we argue that ‘domestic crop booms’ - agricultural booms driven by domestic demand - are contributing to rapid social and ecological transformations in Asia and across the globe. We adopt a comparative multi-scalar approach, and develop the concept of ‘livelihood pathways’ as a means of understanding agrarian change associated with crop booms.

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