Myanmar fisheries: Offshore (Burmese version)

Myanmar’s offshore fish stocks have been depleted by up to 80% since 1979, exposing Myanmar’s people to significant economic, food security, nutrition and environmental risks. This ecosystem decline has been driven by out-dated and weak laws and policies and by inadequate management and institutional capacity. Investment in protecting and restoring fish stocks, ecosystems and habitats is required.

Myanmar fisheries: Freshwater fisheries (Burmese version)

The freshwater fisheries in Myanmar are economically significant and important to livelihoods and food security. Yet significant threats to the resource base and public demand call for the development of management initiatives, legal adjustments and a people-centered approach. This brief identifies a series of options and priorities that could help improving freshwater fisheries management towards a more sustainable and equitable exploitation of inland fish resources.

Myanmar fisheries: Aquaculture

Fish is an extremely important component of the Myanmar diet, and demand is growing quickly as the country urbanizes and incomes rise. Aquaculture is ideally placed to meet this demand, while also raising farm incomes and creating employment. This brief identifies three sets of policy options that could help to unlock the full potential of aquaculture’s contributions to rural growth and national food supply.

Domestic crop booms, livelihood pathways and nested transitions: Charting the implications of Bangladesh's pangasius boom

Rapidly transforming Asian food systems are oriented largely towards domestic markets, yet literature on Asian crop booms deals almost exclusively with commodities produced for export. With reference to pangasius aquaculture in Bangladesh, we argue that ‘domestic crop booms’ - agricultural booms driven by domestic demand - are contributing to rapid social and ecological transformations in Asia and across the globe. We adopt a comparative multi-scalar approach, and develop the concept of ‘livelihood pathways’ as a means of understanding agrarian change associated with crop booms.

Promoting gender-transformative change with men and boys: A Manual to spark critical reflection on harmful gender norms with men and boys in Aquatic Agricultural Systems

The CGIAR Research Program (CRP) on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) led by WorldFish aims to lift millions of people out of poverty and promote positive, transformative change in aquatic agricultural development. The AAS program recognizes that gender and power inequalities between men and women, which are reinforced at all levels of society, are key factors perpetuating poverty. One of the AAS themes aims to engage men as an integral part of its gender-transformative approach to the questioning and fundamental altering of unequal power relations and structures.

The effect of daily consumption of the small fish Amblypharyngodon mola or added vitamin A on iron status: a randomised controlled trial among Bangladeshi children with marginal vitamin A status

Amblypharyngodon mola (mola) is a nutrient-rich, small fish found in ponds and rice fields in Bangladesh. The aim of the present intervention was to assess the effect of mola consumption on iron status in children with marginal vitamin A status.

Coalitions to achieve gender equality at scale: Gender development and coordinating subcommittees and networks as drivers of change in Zambia

Gender inequality affects development outcomes, and it results in sub-optimal returns to development investments. Formal structures have been put in place to address these issues, but their effectiveness is hampered by a number of institutional constraints. This brief summarizes the findings of a scoping study conducted to understand the strengths and areas of growth of the gender development and coordinating subcommittees at the district and provincial levels in western Zambia, and of the gender networks at the national level.

Distribution, migrations and breeding of Hilsa (Tenualosa ilisha) in the Ayeyarwady system in Myanmar

Hilsa (Tenualosa ilisha) is a major fishery resource in the Bay of Bengal. In order to ensure the sustainability of this resource, through effective management measures, information is required on its distribution patterns, migration routes and breeding sites. This study fills these knowledge gaps in Myanmar’s Ayeyarwady Delta. The findings are based on systematic gathering of local ecological knowledge among experienced fishers in thirty-two sites.

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