Is resilience socially constructed? Empirical evidence from Fiji, Ghana, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam

The objective of this paper is to better understand the various individual and household factors that influence resilience, that is, people’s ability to respond adequately to shocks and stressors. One of our hypotheses is that resilience does not simply reflect the expected effects of quantifiable factors such as level of assets, or even less quantifiable social processes such as people’s experience, but is also determined by more subjective dimensions related to people’s perceptions of their ability to cope, adapt or transform in the face of adverse events.

Vitamin status among breastfed Infants in Bhaktapur, Nepal

Vitamin deficiencies are known to be common among infants residing in low- and middle-income countries but relatively few studies have assessed several biochemical parameters simultaneously.The purpose of this study was to describe the status of key vitamins (A, D, E, B6, B12 and folate, and the biomarkers total homocysteine and methylmalonic acid) in a random sample of breastfed infants, from two months of age, residing in Bhaktapur, Nepal.

Social and gender analysis report: Barotse Floodplain, Western Province,Zambia

There is increasing awareness that integrating gender into development frameworks is critical for effective implementation of development strategies. In working to alleviate rural poverty, the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) recognizes that “business as usual” gender integration approaches will not deliver lasting and widespread improvements in agricultural productivity, poverty reduction and food security. In response, AAS operationalized a gender transformative approach.

Resource conflict, collective action, and resilience: an analytical framework

Where access to renewable natural resources essential to rural livelihoods is highly contested, improving cooperation in resource management is an important element in strategies for peacebuilding and conflict prevention. While researchers have made advances in assessing the role of environmental resources as a causal factor in civil conflict, analysis of the positive potential of collective natural resource management efforts to reduce broader conflict is less developed.

Promoting the sustainable growth of aquaculture in Myanmar to improve food Security and income for communities in the Ayeyarwady Delta and Central Dry Zone (MYFC)

MYFC, a Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT) funded project, aims to promote sustainable growth of aquaculture in Myanmar. By introducing low cost poly-culture combining small indigenous species of fish with mostly carps, the project intends to increase income, food and nutrition security for resource-poor households in the Ayeyarwady Delta and the central dry zone (CDZ). With a particular focus on women and children, and running over three years (2016-2018), MYFC will target four townships in each area.

Increasing water productivity in agriculture

Increasing water productivity is an important element in improved water management for sustainable agriculture, food security and healthy ecosystem functioning. Water productivity is defined as the amount of agricultural output per unit of water depleted, and can be assessed for crops, trees, livestock and fish. This chapter reviews challenges in and opportunities for improving water productivity in socially equitable and sustainable ways by thinking beyond technologies, and fostering enabling institutions and policies.

Choosing the best model in the presence of zero trade: A Fish product analysis

The purpose of the chapter is to test the hypothesis that food safety (chemical) standards act as barriers to international seafood imports. We use zero-accounting gravity models to test the hypothesis that food safety (chemical) standards act as barriers to international seafood imports. The chemical standards on which we focus include chloramphenicol required performance limit, oxytetracycline maximum residue limit, fluoro-quinolones maximum residue limit, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) pesticide residue limit.

Understanding livelihoods dependent on inland fisheries in Bangladesh and Southeast Asia: Vietnam PRA report

During the period of May to July 2002, An Giang University, in conjunction with the Chau Phu, Thoai Son and Chau Doc District People's Committees, and Can Tho University conducted Participatory Rural Appraisals (PRAs) in four different Provinces. The research findings from this study are presented in this report. The purpose of this exercise was to better understand the livelihoods of people living in rural areas and depending mainly on inland capture fisheries.

Potentials for different models for freshwater aquaculture development in the Red River Delta (Vietnam) using GIS analysis

This study was an attempt to apply land-based GIS analysis for freshwater aquaculture planning in the Red River Delta of Vietnam. It was based on diverse data sources in order to help decision makers at the site and also to contribute to the modelling of selection processes for aquaculture development planning in the region.

A Bayesian method to support global out-scaling of water-efficient rice technologies from pilot project areas

This article present a Bayesian probabilistic method to support out-scaling of technologies from pilot projects. The method is applied to aerobic rice, a water-saving technology with probable global potential. The method assumes that areas similar to pilot sites are more likely to adopt than those that are different or unfavourable. Similarity is defined from climate, landscape and socio-economic attributes. Favourability is further evaluated by project specialists. Scaling out is not a simple linear process, so the method is proposed as a complement to learning processes.

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