Socio-cultural dynamics shaping the potential of aquaculture to deliver development outcomes

There is growing appreciation of the role of aquaculture in diversifying livelihoods of the poor. However, prevailing cultural norms and values, and social relations often influence its development outcomes, which we explore in this study. Socio-cultural dynamics affect the capacity of resource-poor and marginalized groups for the adoption and retention of aquaculture technologies.

Sustainability as a dialogue of values: Challenges to the sociology of development

Even in an increasingly polarized climate of global policy-making, the ideal of “sustainable development” retains currency across a remarkably broad swath of the political spectrum in debating alternative scenarios for the future. By adapting Weber's classic categories of value spheres and collective rationality, I distinguish contemporary approaches to operationalizing the concept of sustainability and elucidate the practical implications of each.

An assessment of chemical and biological product use in aquaculture in Bangladesh

The aim of this study is to describe current chemical use practices in the aquaculture sector of Bangladesh and to identify the factors that influence them. A survey on the use of chemical and biological products was performed between November 2011 and June 2012 using structured questionnaires performed to producers of nine farm groups including homestead ponds, carps, tilapias, koi fish, shrimps, shrimps and prawns, only prawns, rice and fish, and pangas.

Comparison of Asian aquaculture products by use of statistically supported life cycle assessment

In this article, the authors investigated aquaculture production of Asian tiger shrimp, whiteleg shrimp, giant river prawn, tilapia, and pangasius catfish in Bangladesh, China, Thailand, and Vietnam by using life cycle assessments (LCAs), with the purpose of evaluating the comparative eco-efficiency of producing different aquatic food products.

Assessing adaptation options for climate change: A guide for coastal communities in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific. 8. Implementation planning

This brochure is part of a series that collectively detail how a community-based assessment of climate change was used in partnership with coastal communities and provincial and national-level stakeholders in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands. The assessment contains four distinct, but related, steps focused on supporting community-level decision-making for adaptation through a series of participatory action research activities. Each brochure in this series details a specific activity in the four-step assessment.

Assessing adaptation options for climate change: A guide for coastal communities in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific. 5. Social network analysis

This brochure is part of a series that collectively detail how a community-based assessment of climate change was used in partnership with coastal communities and provincial and national-level stakeholders in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands. The assessment contains four distinct, but related, steps focused on supporting community-level decision-making for adaptation through a series of participatory action research activities. Each brochure in this series details a specific activity in the four-step assessment.

Rotational harvesting is a risky strategy for vulnerable marine animals

Sea cucumber fisheries exemplify resource systems under intense exploitation pressure from lucrative Asian markets. Plagányi et al. (1) model the performance of rotational harvests of sea cucumbers on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and advocate it globally. The authors support their aim to evaluate management models but believe the tenets of the strategy are flawed, key model inputs bias the outputs, and inferences to other coastal fisheries are overreaching.

Annual report 2014/2015

Today, fish is recognized as a global superfood, providing nutrients and micronutrients that are essential to cognitive and physical development, especially in children, and is an important part of a healthy diet. Globally, 3 billion people rely on fish for almost 20% of their animal protein. And demand for fish is increasing. Projections suggest that we will have a 68–78 million metric ton shortfall of fish by 2030. This will be especially acute in sub-Saharan Africa, where aquaculture has yet to fully develop and where fish consumption is projected to decline.

Envisioning possible futures for fish production in Indonesia

This report summarizes the results of a systematic effort to explore possible futures for aquaculture and fisheries in Indonesia. The work described is part of a larger effort that seeks to develop a shared vision for the sectors that 1) aligns public and private investments to foster growth and economic sustainability; 2) reduces environmental impacts and improves efficiency; 3) increases access by small and medium enterprises to the financial and technical assistance necessary to transition to more sustainable practices.

Synthesis report: Identification of enabling and disenabling social and cultural factors affecting aquaculture development

Success or failure of any development intervention is largely dependent on human capital, social capital of households and a range of socio-cultural factors that include culture, religion, beliefs, ethnicity, caste, nationality, social norms and gender; these socio-culture factors are not discrete but interact simultaneously. Development interventions must be harmonized with given specific socio-cultural contexts for successful adoption and retention of development interventions.

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