Planning the use of fish for food security in Solomon Islands

This study was funded through the USAID-supported Coral Triangle Support Partnership (CTSP). As part of the US CTI Support Program, CTSP is part of the United States Government’s commitment to promote the sustainable management of the marine and coastal resources in the Coral Triangle. In cooperation with the Coral Triangle national governments and the international community, CTSP is a five-year program that provides technical assistance and helps build capacity to address critical issues including food security, climate change, and marine biological diversity.

Economic analysis of climate change adaptation strategies in selected coastal areas in Indonesia, Philippines and Vietnam

This report is an account of a cross-country study that covered Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippines. Covering four sites (one each in Indonesia and Vietnam) and two sites in the Philippines, the study documented the impacts of three climate hazards affecting coastal communities, namely typhoon/flooding, coastal erosion and saltwater intrusion. It also analyzed planned adaptation options, which communities and local governments can implement, as well as autonomous responses of households to protect and insure themselves from these hazards.

Community based fish culture in the public and private floodplains of Bangladesh

Seasonal floodplains under private and public ownership in the Indo-Ganges river basin provide food and income for millions of people in Bangladesh. This research aimed to understand the complex institutional relations that govern ownership, access, and control of the floodplains under Community Based Fish Culture (CBFC) to increase fish production and overall livelihoods of the poor.

The WorldFish Center: Malawi

The role of the WorldFish Center is to research and disseminate appropriate aquaculture and fisheries technologies for sustainable agricultural intensification. To achieve these goals the WorldFish Center works in partnership with the government of Malawi. It leverages success by collaborating with both local and overseas academic research organizations, drawing funding from the global development community.

Rice-fish integration for high saline, coastal areas of Bangladesh: Learning from the Challenge Program for Water and Food (CPWF)

The Southwestern coastal zone of Bangladesh is agro-based and one of the world’s most populous, poverty-stricken and food-insecure regions, with high vulnerability to climate change. Shrimp aquaculture rapidly expanded in this tidal floodplain but shrimp is highly susceptible to disease, has less contribution in local consumption, and its profitability depends on international market prices, leading the demand for improving the farming system.

A Bayesian method to support global out-scaling of water-efficient rice technologies from pilot project areas

This article present a Bayesian probabilistic method to support out-scaling of technologies from pilot projects. The method is applied to aerobic rice, a water-saving technology with probable global potential. The method assumes that areas similar to pilot sites are more likely to adopt than those that are different or unfavourable. Similarity is defined from climate, landscape and socio-economic attributes. Favourability is further evaluated by project specialists. Scaling out is not a simple linear process, so the method is proposed as a complement to learning processes.

Assessing adaptation options for climate change: A guide for coastal communities in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific. 3. Impact and adaptation assessment workshop

This brochure is part of a series that collectively detail how a community-based assessment of climate change was used in partnership with coastal communities and provincial and national-level stakeholders in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands. The assessment contains four distinct, but related, steps focused on supporting community-level decision-making for adaptation through a series of participatory action research activities. Each brochure in this series details a specific activity in the four-step assessment.

Lake Nasser fisheries: Literature review and situation analysis

This study sought to improve the baseline knowledge of the fisheries of Lake Nasser and to make recommendations for the improved management of the fisheries, including stock assessment. This review draws heavily from the most recent reviews of Lake Nasser and its fisheries, including van Zwieten et al. (2011), Habib et al. (2014) and Habib (2015). It is supplemented with findings from the field study described in the final technical report, Lake Nasser fisheries: Recommendations for management, including monitoring and stock assessment (Halls 2015).

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