Assessing adaptation options for climate change: A guide for coastal communities in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific. 6. Landscape function analysis

This brochure is part of a series that collectively detail how a community-based assessment of climate change was used in partnership with coastal communities and provincial and national-level stakeholders in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands. The assessment contains four distinct, but related, steps focused on supporting community-level decision-making for adaptation through a series of participatory action research activities. Each brochure in this series details a specific activity in the four-step assessment.

Exploring Indonesian aquaculture futures

Aquaculture is the fastest-growing food production sector globally, with production projected to double within the next 15–20 years. Future growth of aquaculture is essential to providing sustainable supplies of fish in national, regional and global fish food systems; creating jobs; and maintaining fish at affordable levels for resource-poor consumers. To ensure that the anticipated growth of aquaculture remains both economically and ecologically sustainable, we need to better understand the likely patterns of growth, as well as the opportunities and challenges, that these trends present.

Reaping the reef: Provisioning services from coral reefs in Solomon Islands

Coral reefs are recognized as globally important ecosystems, for their fisheries, tourism and biodiversity values in particular, with an estimated annual contribution of $30 billion to the global economy. The benefits that coral reef ecosystems provide through their provisioning, regulating, cultural and supporting services are critical for human wellbeing. The Coral Triangle region (which includes the waters of Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea (PNG), the Philippines, Solomon Islands and Timor Leste) supports the highest coral and reef fish species diversity in the world.

Contagious exploitation of marine resources

Rising global demand for seafood presents challenges for managing marine resources, many of which are declining or threatened. The authors describe a new and rapid pattern of contagious marine resource exploitation, which spreads via global sourcing networks to satisfy rising demand. They use sea cucumbers to illustrate the concept, given their wide geographic distribution but specific market for consumption in China.

Genetic and non-genetic indirect effects for harvest weight in the GIFT strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

The main objective of this study was to quantify the heritable variation for growth rate of GIFT, and the contribution of IGEs to this heritable variation. Here we describe the experiment conducted for this purpose, and present estimated parameters of genetic and non-genetic indirect effects on growth rate in the GIFT strain.

Good governance of rice field fishery management

Rice field fisheries refer to the capture of wild fish and other aquatic animals from flooded rice field agroecosystems and their supporting infrastructure, such as canals, channels, streams and other bodies of water. Central to maintaining fish productivity in rice fields is a designated conservation area known as a community fish refuge (CFR) that connects to rice fields to form an area known as the zone of influence.

Empowering community-based ecosystem approaches to fisheries management: Strategies for effective training and learning

In March 2015, regional Pacific stakeholders and Governments engaged in collaborative planning to establish a new direction in the management of Coastal Fisheries. A New Song for Coastal Fisheries: Pathways to Change calls for a “...new and innovative approach to dealing with declines in coastal fisheries resources and related ecosystems”. A New Song is an important step forward for coastal fisheries management across a complex and diverse region. This paper argues that a strategic and integrated approach to capacity development, learning and training will support its full implementation.

Performance of the Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia (GIFT) strain over ten generations of selection in Malaysia

A selection programme using Best Linear Unbiased Prediction (BLUP) method for the estimation of genetic merit was implemented by the Department of Fisheries Malaysia (DOF) in collaboration with the WorldFish Centre. This collaborative programme provided opportunities for further improvement of the GIFT strain in Malaysia. The overall aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of GIFT strain during the long-term selection programme in Malaysia.

Vertical agriculture: Homestead horticulture suspended in sacks

Suspending horticulture in sacks above the ground can result in higher levels of productivity for vegetables when the challenges of unfertile or saline soil, flooding, waterlogging, and land and water constraints are regularly encountered. Previously used feed and fertilizer sacks are filled with a high-productivity soil mixture. Vegetables are grown on the top and/or in holes cut into the sides of the sacks. While growing vegetables in sacks has existed for many years in Bangladesh, the technique has been modified by WorldFish in collaboration with farmer researchers.

Pages

Subscribe to WorldFish RSS