Assessing adaptation options for climate change: A guide for coastal communities in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific. 4. Decision-tree and partial cost-benefit analyses

This brochure is part of a series that collectively detail how a community-based assessment of climate change was used in partnership with coastal communities and provincial and national-level stakeholders in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands. The assessment contains four distinct, but related, steps focused on supporting community-level decision-making for adaptation through a series of participatory action research activities. Each brochure in this series details a specific activity in the four-step assessment.

Livelihoods and fisheries governance in a contemporary Pacific Island setting

Inshore marine resources play an important role in the livelihoods of Pacific Island coastal communities. However, such reliance can be detrimental to inshore marine ecosystems. Understanding the livelihoods of coastal communities is important for devising relevant and effective fisheries management strategies. This study examined livelihood considerations within fisheries governance in a contemporary Pacific Island setting.

Keeping food on the table: Human responses and changing coastal fisheries in Solomon Islands

Globally the majority of commercial fisheries have experienced dramatic declines in stock and catch. Likewise, projections for many subsistence fisheries in the tropics indicate a dramatic decline is looming in the coming decades. In the Pacific Islands coastal fisheries provide basic subsistence needs for millions of people. A decline in fish catch would therefore have profound impacts on the health and livelihoods of these coastal communities.

Classifying degrees of species commonness: North Sea fish as a case study

Species commonness is often related to abundance and species conservation status. Intuitively, a "common species" is a species that is abundant in a certain area, widespread and at low risk of extinction. Analysing and classifying species commonness can help discovering indicators of ecosystem status and can prevent sudden changes in biodiversity. However, it is challenging to quantitatively define this concept. This paper presents a procedure to automatically characterize species commonness from biological surveys.

Strengthening capacities for research in development in aquatic agricultural systems

The research-in-development (RinD) approach to agricultural research focuses on working closely with communities through multistakeholder engagement to strengthen capacities to design, plan, implement and adapt research in order to improve the lives and livelihoods of the resource-poor living in complex social-ecological systems. The approach requires researchers and implementing partners to learn new skills and build new capacities as they work in multistakeholder teams.

Problems in estimating growth parameters of the wahoo Acanthocybium solandri (Scombridae) using the ELEFAN 1 program

Plots of Rn, the goodness-of-fit index of teh ELEFAN I program versus K can be used jointly with fixed values of the other growth parameters to identify "optimum values" of K. This is here illustrated using data on wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri, Fam. Scombridae) from St. Lucia, West India.

Reaping the reef: Provisioning services from coral reefs in Solomon Islands

Coral reefs are recognized as globally important ecosystems, for their fisheries, tourism and biodiversity values in particular, with an estimated annual contribution of $30 billion to the global economy. The benefits that coral reef ecosystems provide through their provisioning, regulating, cultural and supporting services are critical for human wellbeing. The Coral Triangle region (which includes the waters of Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea (PNG), the Philippines, Solomon Islands and Timor Leste) supports the highest coral and reef fish species diversity in the world.

Enhanced coastal fisheries (ECOFISHBD) Project

Hilsa shad is the national fish of Bangladesh. However, overfishing, siltation, pollution and changing climate lead to a sharp decline in the fish population, theatening the livelihoods of the people dependent upon the hilsa fishery. The United States Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Enhanced Coastal Fisheries (ECOFISHBD) project seeks to improve the resilience of the hilsa fishery in the Padma-Meghna river-ecosystem and the livelihoods that depend upon it.

Inclusion of small indigenous fish improves nutritional quality during the first 1000 days

Key contributing factors to undernutrition in low-income countries, including Bangladesh, are low dietary diversity in the diets of women and low nutrient density of traditional complementary foods (CFs) for infants and young children. Several plant-based processed CFs have been developed in Bangladesh, however, all have required fortification with vitamins and minerals to achieve desired nutrient densities. There are few examples in the literature of a combined approach using animal source foods (with the exception of milk) in processed food products targeted at the first 1000 days.

Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia (GIFT)

Genetic improvement through selective breeding has been used for millennia on crops and livestock, but up until the 1980s, little had been done to utilize this process for farmed fish. In response to the inadequate supply of tilapia seed and the deteriorating performance of the fish in many aquaculture systems in Asia, WorldFish and partners began the Genetic Improvement of Farmed Tilapia (GIFT) project to develop a faster-growing strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) that was suitable for both small-scale and commercial aquaculture.

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