Value chain analysis of the aquaculture feed sector in Egypt

This study was carried out to evaluate the value chain performance of the aquaculture feed sector in Egypt, in terms of value addition, employment and profitability. The strengths and weaknesses of each link of the value chain were assessed and appropriate upgrading, management and development strategies were suggested. Quantitative data were collected for each link in the value-chain through structured questionnaires that were drafted and distributed to the key players in the sector; 25 fish feed mills and 34 fish farms covering different geographical and production regions.

Value-chain analysis of Egyptian aquaculture [in Arabic]

Egypt’s aquaculture production (705,490 tonnes in 2009) is by far the largest of any African country and places it 11th in terms of global production. The aquaculture sector makes a significant contribution to income, employment creation and food security in the country, all of which are national priority areas given low per capita income levels, rising population, worsening food security indicators, and official unemployment levels which have remained at around 10% for the last ten years.

Value-chain analysis: an assessment methodology to estimate Egyptian aquaculture sector performance

Egypt's aquaculture production (705,490 tonnes in 2009) is by far the largest of any African country and places it 11th in terms of global aquaculture production. The aquaculture sector in Egypt is now a mature one having developed over a period of more than 30 years, but the financial performance of the sector is not well understood or documented, even though value-chain analysis provides a methodological tool to do so.

Understanding adaptation and transformation through indigenous practice: the case of the Guna of Panama

Resilience is emerging as a promising vehicle for improving management of social-ecological systems that can potentially lead to more sustainable arrangements between environmental and social spheres. Central to an understanding of how to support resilience is the need to understand social change and its links with adaptation and transformation. Our aim is to contribute to insights about and understanding of underlying social dynamics at play in social-ecological systems.

Uganda aquaculture value chains: strategic planning mission: summary report

This report presents the findings and recommendations of a strategic planning mission to reevaluate the feasibility of WorldFish implementing a fish value chain research program in Uganda under the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish (L&F). The over-arching goal of L&F is to increase productivity of small-scale livestock and fish systems so as to increase availability and affordability of meat, milk and fish for poor consumers and, in doing so, to reduce poverty through greater participation by the poor along animal source food value chains.

Uganda and Malawi field pilots of proposed LSMS fisheries module: summary report

While an overwhelming majority of sub-Saharan African countries exhibit serious weaknesses in statistics pertaining to crop and livestock sectors, the deficiencies in terms of nationallyrepresentative data on the fishery sector are even more acute. The very little data available on the sector are essentially derived from case studies of selected fisheries, and the limited nationally representative data available are generally derived from a few questions included in the livestock section of household surveys.

Two steps forward, two steps back: The role of innovation in transforming towards community-based marine resource management in Solomon Islands

In many coastal nations, community-based arrangements for marine resource management (CBRM) are promoted by government, advocated for by non-government actors, and are seen by both as one of the most promising options to achieve sustainable use and secure inshore fisheries and aquatic resources. Although there is an abundant literature on what makes CBRM effective, is it less clear how CBRM is introduced or develops as an idea in a community, and the process of how the idea leads to the adoption of a new resource management approach with supporting institutions.

Trophic model of the coastal fisheries ecosystem of the west coast of peninsular Malaysia

A preliminary mass-balance trophic model was constructed for the coastal fisheries ecosystem of the West Coast of Peninsular Malaysia (0 - 120 m depth). The ecosystem was partitioned into 15 trophic groups, and biomasses for selected groups were obtained from research (trawl) surveys conducted in the area in 1987 and 1991. Trophic interactions of the groups are presented. The network analysis indicates that fishing fleets for demersal fishes and prawns have a major direct or indirect impact on most high-trophic level groups in the ecosystem.

Trophic model of the coastal fisheries ecosystem in the Gulf of Thailand

The biomass of 40 ecological groups, the diet composition of prey and predators, production/biomass (P/B) and consumption/biomass (Q/B) ratios, and catches were used as basic input to parameterize an Ecopath model of the Gulf of Thailand. Following construction of a mass-balance ecosystem model, a time-dynamic simulation model (Ecosim) was used to simulate the impact of change in fishing effort. This was done using time series data to validate the historic fisheries development in the Gulf of Thailand prior to using the model for forward-looking simulations.

The trochus resource in New Caledonia

New Caledonia, which is surrounded by one of the largest lagoons in the world, is a good reservoir of the Pacific species of trochus (Trochus niloticus). The shell of this large marine gastropod yields one of the thickest, most beautiful mother-of-pearls available on the world market. This article gives a brief account of the trochus resource found in the island.

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